Edward S. Curtis

By: Cardozo Fine Art

1 note

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!Port. 20, Pl. 700- King Island Village from the Sea
The King Islanders occupy dwellings erected on stilts on the cliff side, giving their village an unusual and highly picturesque appearance.
*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!

Port. 20, Pl. 700- King Island Village from the Sea

The King Islanders occupy dwellings erected on stilts on the cliff side, giving their village an unusual and highly picturesque appearance.

*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.




1 note

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!Port. 20, Pl. 699- The Village - Hooper Bay
This settlement consists of dwellings dug and built into a hill with such little regard for order that the entrance to one may open on the roof of a house below.
*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!

Port. 20, Pl. 699- The Village - Hooper Bay

This settlement consists of dwellings dug and built into a hill with such little regard for order that the entrance to one may open on the roof of a house below.

*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

0 notes

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!Port. 20, Pl. 698- Hooper Bay Youth
No text on title page
*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!

Port. 20, Pl. 698- Hooper Bay Youth

No text on title page

*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

0 notes

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!Port. 20, Pl. 697- Ugiyaku - Nunivak
A portrait of the subject shown also in Plate 693, with a different and modified costume.
*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!

Port. 20, Pl. 697- Ugiyaku - Nunivak

A portrait of the subject shown also in Plate 693, with a different and modified costume.

*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

0 notes

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!Port. 20, Pl. 696- Uyowutcha - Nunivak
The effect of trade is shown in this and in other portraits by the buttons with which this child’s cap is ornamented; otherwise the costume is quite aboriginal.
*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!

Port. 20, Pl. 696- Uyowutcha - Nunivak

The effect of trade is shown in this and in other portraits by the buttons with which this child’s cap is ornamented; otherwise the costume is quite aboriginal.

*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

1 note

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!Port. 20, Pl. 695- Ready for Sealing - Nunivak
The kaiak of this Nunivak sealer is fully equipped with the apparatus required for augmenting the family larder. Sealing is of prime importance to the people of Nunivak island, the seal being sought in spring and in fall during their northward and southward migrations respectively.
*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!

Port. 20, Pl. 695- Ready for Sealing - Nunivak

The kaiak of this Nunivak sealer is fully equipped with the apparatus required for augmenting the family larder. Sealing is of prime importance to the people of Nunivak island, the seal being sought in spring and in fall during their northward and southward migrations respectively.

*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

1 note

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!Port. 20, Pl. 694- Woman and Child - Nunivak
No text on title page
*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!

Port. 20, Pl. 694- Woman and Child - Nunivak

No text on title page

*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

1 note

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!Port. 20, Pl. 693- Ugiyaku - Nunivak
This contented young woman wears a nose-ring and a labret similar to those of the girl in Plate 691. Her waterproof hooded parka is made of intestinal parchment.
*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!

Port. 20, Pl. 693- Ugiyaku - Nunivak

This contented young woman wears a nose-ring and a labret similar to those of the girl in Plate 691. Her waterproof hooded parka is made of intestinal parchment.

*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

0 notes

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!Port. 20, Pl. 692- The Drummer - Nunivak
This tambourine-like instrument, its head made of walrus stomach or bladder, is used chiefly in the winter ceremonies. Such drums vary in diameter from a foot to five feet; the one illustrated measured three feet six inches. When beaten, the drum is held in a position varying from horizontal to vertical. The drum-stick is a slender wand.
*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!

Port. 20, Pl. 692- The Drummer - Nunivak

This tambourine-like instrument, its head made of walrus stomach or bladder, is used chiefly in the winter ceremonies. Such drums vary in diameter from a foot to five feet; the one illustrated measured three feet six inches. When beaten, the drum is held in a position varying from horizontal to vertical. The drum-stick is a slender wand.

*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

0 notes

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!Port. 20, Pl. 691- Kenowun - Nunivak
The nose-ring and labret of beads are typical.
*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!

Port. 20, Pl. 691- Kenowun - Nunivak

The nose-ring and labret of beads are typical.

*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.