Edward S. Curtis

By: Cardozo Fine Art

2 notes

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!Port. 19, Pl. 666- Cheyenne Costume
This woman’s deerskin costume, ornamented with porcupine-quill embroidery and with beads and fringe, is characteristic of that of the Cheyenne; but such is now worn only on gala occasions and probably ere very long will be a thing of the past.
*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!

Port. 19, Pl. 666- Cheyenne Costume

This woman’s deerskin costume, ornamented with porcupine-quill embroidery and with beads and fringe, is characteristic of that of the Cheyenne; but such is now worn only on gala occasions and probably ere very long will be a thing of the past.

*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

1 note

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!Port. 19, Pl. 665- The Lone Chief - Cheyenne
No text on title page
*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!

Port. 19, Pl. 665- The Lone Chief - Cheyenne

No text on title page

*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

0 notes

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!Port. 19, Pl. 664- A Cheyenne Chief
The Cheyenne belong to the Algonquian linguistic family and therefore are related to the tribes of the Blackfoot Confederacy and to the Arapaho of the north, and, much more remotely, to many of the tribes that once lived along the Atlantic seaboard and in the Midwest. They are now divided in the Northern Cheyenne, living in Montana, and the Southern Cheyenne who were assigned a reservation in the present Oklahoma in 1867.
*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise not

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!

Port. 19, Pl. 664- A Cheyenne Chief

The Cheyenne belong to the Algonquian linguistic family and therefore are related to the tribes of the Blackfoot Confederacy and to the Arapaho of the north, and, much more remotely, to many of the tribes that once lived along the Atlantic seaboard and in the Midwest. They are now divided in the Northern Cheyenne, living in Montana, and the Southern Cheyenne who were assigned a reservation in the present Oklahoma in 1867.

*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise not

0 notes

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!Port. 19, Pl. 663- At the pool, Animal Dance - Cheyenne
No text on title page
*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!

Port. 19, Pl. 663- At the pool, Animal Dance - Cheyenne

No text on title page

*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

0 notes

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!Port. 19, Pl. 662- Water Rite Purification, Cheyenne Animal Dance
No text on title page
*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise not

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!

Port. 19, Pl. 662- Water Rite Purification, Cheyenne Animal Dance

No text on title page

*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise not

0 notes

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!Port. 19, Pl. 661- Hotamitaye Society, Cheyenne Sun-Dance
The members of this and of other bands, which were created by the Prophet of Cheyenne legend, go to the forest for the poles with which to build the lodge. While in the forest they decorate themselves and their horses with willow branches, leaving the rearmost horsemen to drag the poles to camp.
*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise not

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!

Port. 19, Pl. 661- Hotamitaye Society, Cheyenne Sun-Dance

The members of this and of other bands, which were created by the Prophet of Cheyenne legend, go to the forest for the poles with which to build the lodge. While in the forest they decorate themselves and their horses with willow branches, leaving the rearmost horsemen to drag the poles to camp.

*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise not

0 notes

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!Port. 19, Pl. 660- Cheyenne Sun-Dance Lodge
No text on title page
*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise not

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!

Port. 19, Pl. 660- Cheyenne Sun-Dance Lodge

No text on title page

*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise not

1 note

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!Port. 19, Pl. 659- On the Canadian River
The name of the Canadian river was not derived from any association with Canada or the Canadians, but from the Spanish canada, on account of the high, cut banks of the stream. The Canadian originally divided the lands claimed by the Quapaw on the south and those of the Great and Little Osage on the north. The Indians in the picture are Cheyenne.
*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!

Port. 19, Pl. 659- On the Canadian River

The name of the Canadian river was not derived from any association with Canada or the Canadians, but from the Spanish canada, on account of the high, cut banks of the stream. The Canadian originally divided the lands claimed by the Quapaw on the south and those of the Great and Little Osage on the north. The Indians in the picture are Cheyenne.

*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise noted.

5 notes

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!Port. 19, Pl. 658- The Story of the Washita
An old Cheyenne warrior recounts the famous battle of the Washita in 1868, when the tribe was severely defeated by General Custer.
*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise not

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!

Port. 19, Pl. 658- The Story of the Washita

An old Cheyenne warrior recounts the famous battle of the Washita in 1868, when the tribe was severely defeated by General Custer.

*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise not

0 notes

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!Port. 19, Pl. 657- Walter Ross - Wichita
No text on title page
*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise not

Your daily photo from Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian!

Port. 19, Pl. 657- Walter Ross - Wichita

No text on title page

*All text is from The North American Indian title pages. These were notes taken by Curtis in the field unless otherwise not